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 Company formation & related

The constitution of a NZ company is a document that sets out the rules for running the company. You are able to have a company without a constitution and to rely instead on the constitution in the first three schedules of the COMPANIES ACT 1993, which will then automatically apply to your company. This would be acceptable for a husband and wife company, but it is advisable to have a specially designed constitution in any other situation.

This range of New Zealand company formation and maintenance documents allows for the setting up of a company, templates for company meetings, liquidation & amalgamation issues.




Company constitution

99.00  

A company constitution is a "rule book" for how a New Zealand company will be run.

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Company agenda and minutes pack

55.00  

This pack contains a number of templates for New Zealand company meetings and resolutions. The pack includes documents and a user guide for the opening Minutes to Resolution of shareholders

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Opening resolution of company

55.00  

This document is the first resolution that the Trustee(s) of a New Zealand compnay will pass.

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Liquidation -short form

65.00  

This pack contains a user guide with comprehensive process notes, a resolution that the company has ceased business, letter to IRD, and notice as is required for a short form New Zealand liquidation.

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Amalgamation - short form

65.00  

This pack contains documents necessary to complete a short form amalgamation pursuant to s222 of the New Zealand Companies Act with comprehensive process notes.

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